Plenary Sessions

New Challenges in Research Integrity (Plenary A)

Session Chair

  • Mai Har Sham, The University of Hong Kong

Plenary Speakers

Integrity in innovation and impact (Plenary B)

Our responsibility to produce research with integrity doesn’t end when the research is published. The translation of research from an output to an outcome must also be conducted with integrity.

Integrity in Innovation and Impact asks us about the role of integrity in the overall research process – from idea to impact. What role does research integrity have in these activities? Are current approaches, aimed largely at producing research that is trustworthy and honest, also the same for ensuring that the translation and implementation of research findings is also trustworthy and honest? What impact do attempts to measure post-publication research activities and engagement with end-users of research have on responsible research conduct (for example, if we engage more with industry who have clear expectations on deliverables and timelines, does this increase the pressure to falsify data?)?

This topic is broader than societal responsibilities, and asks us to consider what happens to our research once it is published. What to the next users of research findings needs to see in our research? What does industry think about the challenges of reproducibility and replication? What do governments need to see in order to make more or better use of research findings in their decision making?

Session Chair

  • Zoё Hammatt, Z Consulting, LLC

Plenary Speakers

Institutional assessment of researchers (Plenary C)

The current academic institutional reward system does not take the importance of research integrity into account. On the contrary, the heavy reliance on metrics (such as numbers of publications, impact factor, h-index, etc) and the emphasis on quantity over quality have the unintended consequence to potentially encourage bad research practices. And other elements of good research practice (such as data sharing; open data discussions; taking societal need into account when deciding on research topics; undertaking peer review; publishing research completely; transparently; and openly accessible) are not rewarded.

This plenary will introduce a set of principles for an institutional reward system that not only takes research integrity into account but also truly recognizes and rewards high-quality, important, relevant, innovative, and trustworthy research. These principles will be further developed during two focus sessions, finalized shortly after the conference, and will be the outcome document of this World Conference on Research Integrity in Hong Kong.

Session Chair

  • Lex Bouter, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Plenary Speakers

Solutions that make a difference (Plenary D)

We still know very little on the most important determinants of research misconduct and questionable research practices. Consequently, evidence-based interventions are not yet available. But that does not mean that we should wait and do nothing. In fact, a number of very promising game changers are rapidly being adopted or about to be launched. The evidence that these ‘solutions that make a difference’ really work is incomplete, although some direct or circumstantial evidence is available. This session will feature two solutions focusing on that are already in the phase of early adoption: preregistration and changing the reward system. In addition, it introduces the ‘Embassy of Good Science’, a new platform for researchers, educators, policy makers and institutional leaders, focusing on communication and exchange.

Session Chair

  • Lex Bouter, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Plenary Speakers

Perspectives for funding agencies in shaping responsible research practices (Plenary E)

Funding agencies are accountable for public investment in research and thus play an increasingly important role in ensuring the quality and integrity of research outputs. This session will discuss the roles of funding agencies in enhancing responsible research practices in research communities, from the perspectives of a government funding agency, an independent foundation and a senior university leader in different regions.

Speakers will share their expectations, requirements as well as specific monitoring procedures for ensuring that funded projects are conducted in accordance with relevant legislation and good research practice.

Session Chair

  • Mai Har Sham, The University of Hong Kong

Plenary Speakers

Asia in focus: Recent advances in fostering research integrity (Plenary F)

Presentations on national research integrity systems are a common feature of WCRI events. However, holding the conference in Hong Kong, China provides an opportunity to place a spotlight on specific initiatives from Asia that are backed by research into their effectiveness.

Novel and diverse initiatives that aim to foster responsible research in culturally appropriate ways have been established across Asia and continue to rapidly develop. While there are multiple examples, this plenary session will highlight key initiatives, new research into their impact, and their advocates from the People’s Republic of China, Republic of Korea, and Malaysia.

Since ‘Hwang-gate’, the research and education sector of the Republic of Korea has undergone rapid ‘ethical modernization’ alongside significant increases in research funding. Sophisticated engagement with researchers to improve the understanding of research integrity has been a characteristic of this change resulting in novel approaches. A similar story of rapid change within the context of a deep history of scholarly tradition is also characteristic of research in the People’s Republic of China, now the world’s largest producer of scientific articles. Insights into research integrity and how it is perceived by researchers in the People’s Republic of China are relevant now more than ever. A new response to research integrity is also being formed in Malaysia. A national code for responsible research has recently been introduced as has education initiatives. In contrast to many other systems, a driving force behind the advances made in Malaysia are early career researchers.

Session Chair

  • Daniel Barr, RMIT University

Plenary Speakers

Predatory publishing and other challenges of new models to share knowledge (Plenary G)

The number of “predatory” journals has increased exponentially over the last few years, as has the volume of research published in them. Predatory journals present a challenge to the quality and reliability of the research record. This has a consequential impact for everyone who relies on the work of the research community, not to mention the impact on the quality of, for example, appointment and promotion decisions when they’re made based on publications. Paradoxically, predatory journals are often open access, a quality being promoted by funders and others. This sends confusing and apparently contradictory messages.

The plenary will address these themes from the following perspectives:
To uphold the quality and integrity of the research record, it is necessary to distinguish between legitimate and illegitimate models to share knowledge and stop the spread of illegitimate models (so-called predatory journals). What are these distinguishing characteristics?
We need new models of dissemination, so that all credible research may be shared. What are the intended and unintended consequences of these models, including but not limited to open access and preprints?
How can the responses to these questions facilitate good publication choices for researchers, and sound promotion and grant evaluation criteria for administrators and funders?

Session Chair

  • Susan Zimmerman, Secretariat on Responsible Conduct of Research

Plenary Speakers

Steneck-Mayer Lecture

The Steneck-Mayer Lecture is named after Professor Nicholas H. Steneck and Mr. Tony Mayer who together started the World Conferences on Research Integrity (WCRIs). Their vision of a World Conference in Lisbon, Portugal in 2007 gave rise to the continuing series of conferences with worldwide impact. Thanks to their hard work, persistence, and unwavering commitment, the WCRIs have become the premier global events on research integrity.

Professor Steneck has recently retired from his role in the WCRIs. Given the roles that he and Mr. Mayer have played in establishing the conferences and research integrity as a discipline, the Steneck-Mayer Lecture will be inaugurated as a part of the WCRIs starting from the 6th meeting to be held in Hong Kong on June 2-5, 2019.

Session Chair

  • Melissa Anderson, University of Minnesota

Plenary Speaker

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