Programme

Programme Overview

Note: The Conference programme is subject to revision and changes and will be updated from time to time.

2nd World Conference on Research Integrity 2010
Leadership Challenges and Responses

 

 

7/21/2010

7/22/2010

7/23/2010

7/24/2010

8:00

 

Registration

Registration 

Post-Conference workshops and training sessions:

Workshop 1: Training for Misconduct Investigations

Workshop 2: Next Steps in the Development of Organizational, National, and Global Codes of Conduct

Workshop 3: International Responsible Conduct of Research Education Workshop

Workshop 4: Workshop for Editors & Publishers

9:00

 

Opening by Singapore Minster for Education,
Dr Ng Eng Hen

Keynote Address by Professor David Vaux
(La Trobe University, Australia)

Plenary  3:
Best Practices

10:30

Arrival of Delegates

Break

Break

11:00

Registration

Plenary 1:
Research Leaders

Concurrent 2

12:30

 

Lunch

Lunch

2:00

Concurrent 1

Concurrent 3

4:00

 

Break

Break

4:30

 

Plenary 2:
National Structures

Closing Plenary

6:15

Conference Welcomes

Reception

 

7:30

Informal Reception

Dinner

 

  Plenary and other sessions for all participants

 

  Concurrent sessions to address three or four topics at one time in smaller groups

 

  Breaks and social events

 

  Post-conference workshops and training sessions

 

II. Plenary Sessions

Opening Ceremonies and Plenary Sessions

Opening Ceremonies and Addresses 22 July, 9:00 - 10:30
Pacific 3
Chair: Su Guaning (Nanyang Technological University)  
Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Ng Eng Hen (GOH) Ministry of Education Singapore Guest of Honor Talk
Su Guaning Nanyang Technological University Singapore Welcome and Session Chair
Seeram Ramakrishna National University of Singapore Singapore Welcome
Howard Hunter Singapore Management University Singapore Welcome
Lim Chuan Poh Agency of Science, Technology and Research Singapore Welcome
David Vaux LaTrobe University Australia Keynote Address
Tony Mayer European Science Foundation / Nanyang Technological University Singapore-UK Introduction of Singapore Statement

Plenary I:  Integrity Challenges for Research Leaders 22 July, 11:00 - 12:30
Pacific 3
Chair: Ian Halliday (European Science Foundation)  
Building on the Conference Background Paper, this session will identify and discuss the main challenges research leaders face in setting and maintaining high standards for integrity in research. Speakers will represent the views of research funders and regulators, universities and other research performers, publishers/editors, and research professionals. 
Speaker Name Organization Country/Region Title
Nicholas Steneck Office of Research Integrity / University of Michigan United States An short history of the road to the 2nd World Conference on Research Integrity
Lee Eng Hin Agency for Science, Technology And Research Singapore Research Integrity Challenges – a Singapore Perspective
Allison Lerner National Science Foundation, Office of Inspector General United States Research Integrity Challenges: NSF OIG's Perspective
Ke Gong Tianjin University China How Do Chinese Universities Respond to Misconduct in Research?
Howard Alper, O.C. University of Ottawa Canada Stakeholder leadership in addressing research integrity challenges
Sabine Kleinert Committee on Pubication Ethics United Kingdom Challenges for editors as guardians of the research recordishers

Plenary II:  Developing National and International Research Integrity Structures 22 July, 16:30 - 18:00
Pacific 3
Chair: Carthage Smith (International Council for Science)  
This session will focus on national and international efforts to respond to misconduct and foster integrity in research, with particular attention to ways countries can work together to coordinate policies, share resources and develop global guidelines for investigations and training.  
Speaker Name Organization Country/Region Title
Christine C. Boesz Advisor, U.S Government Accountability Expert United States Challenges in International Collaborations and Recommended Solutions: Prevention and Detection
Ren Yi University of Southern Queensland Australia National, institutional and international approach to research integrity: Australasian perspective
Ian Halliday European Science Foundation Europe The Activities of the European Science Foundation in Promoting Research Integrity in Europe
Edward Kruglyakov Russian Academy of Science Russia Scientific Falsifications in and out of Science
Jose Antonio Cuellar Puente Mexican College of Physicians / National Institutes of Health Mexico Research Integrity in Mexico: Shared Experience and Global Attention
Dirk de Hen ENRIO & LOWI (National Board for Research Integrity) Netherlands Acting after learning: an European approach

Plenary III:  Developing, Sharing and Promoting Best Practices 23 July, 9:00 - 10:30
Pacific 3
Chairs: Donald Wright (Office of Research Integrity)
Wha-Chul Son (Handong University)
 
This session will review and discuss different approaches researchers, research institutions, professional societies, editors, publishers, and others are taking to develop, share, and promote best practices in research, including editorial guidelines, codes of conduct, research integrity training, and other similar efforts.
Speaker Name Organization Country/Region Title
Ovid Tzeng Academia Sinica & National Yang Ming University Chinese Taipei The Threat of Research Integrity in the Net-Blowsing Generation: When There is Nothing left to Plagiarise
Makoto Asashima Tokyo University Japan Promoting best practices for scientists and post-doctoral fellows
John Galland Office of Research Integrity United States Developing, Sharing and Promoting Best Practices
Catherine Quinn Wellcome Trust United Kingdom A sponsor's views
Elizabeth Wager Committee on Publication Ethics United Kingdom Developing, sharing and promoting best practices

Closing Plenary: Formulating a World Statement on the Fundamental Principles of Professionally Responsible Research 23 July, 16:30 - 18:00
Pacific 3
Chairs: Bertil Andersson (Nanyang Technological University)
Nicholas Steneck (ORI and University of Michigan)
Tony Mayer (Nanyang Technological University / European Science Foundation)
 
During this session, rapporteurs from the plenaries and four concurrent sessions will present brief summaries of the major challenges and recommendations that emerged from each setting. Discussion will follow with the goal of reaching consensus on global statement on the fundamental principles of professionally responsible research.
Speaker Name Organization Country/Region Title
Tony Mayer European Science Foundation / Nanyang Technological University Singapore-UK  
Nicholas Steneck Office of Research Integrity United States  
Bertil Andersson Nanyang Technological University Singapore  

III. Concurrent Sessions

Concurrent Sessions 1 & 3 (Working Groups)

Track 1: National and International Research Integrity Structures
This track will provide an opportunity for participants to discuss the development of national and international policies to promote integrity and respond to misconduct in research.
Track 1a: Developing National Research Integrity Structures: Challenges and Opportunities 22 July, 14:00 - 16:00
Pacific 1
Chair: Ren Yi (University of Southern Queensland)  
Should nations have policies on fostering integrity and responding to misconduct in research? If so, what should the policies cover, how should they be developed, and what are the obstacles to the development of effective policies? This session will explore these questions from the perspective of different countries that have developed or are actively in the process of developing research integrity policies.
Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Peggy Fischer National Science Foundation, Office of Inspector General United States US Experiences in Developing Research Integrity Structures
Sylvia Rumball Massey University, New Zealand New Zealand Research Integrity in New Zealand: Current system, Challenges and Recommendations
Daham I. Alani King Abdullah University of Science & Technology Saudi Arabia [Research Integrity Structures in Saudi Arabia]
Soh Osuka RIKEN Japan Effort to Achieve Research Integrity Through Dialogue with Researchers
Boris Yudin Russian Academy of Science Russia Research Community and State Authorities as Distinct Evaluators of Research Conduct/Misconduct
Jean-Pierre Alix The National Center for Scientific Research France How to Improve a Decentralized, Ambiguous National Integrity System?
Eero Vuorio University of Turku Finland How to Revise National Research Guidelines in the Changing International Landscape?
Track 1b: Harmonizing Policies and Promoting International Collaboration 23 July, 14:00 - 16:00
Pacific 1
Chairs: Allison Lerner (National Science Foundation, Office of Inspector General)
Tae Woong Yoon (Korea University)
 
With researchers collaborating with colleagues in different countries and countries collaborating on projects, is there a need for greater harmonization of research integrity and research misconduct policies. Focusing first on the definition of misconduct, this session will explore what can be done to harmonize policies and the obstacles to harmonization.
Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Daniele Fanelli University of Edinburgh United Kingdom The Black, the White and the Gray Areas: Towards an International and Interdisciplinary Definition of Scientific Misconduct
Glyndwr Davies Research Councils UK (RCUK) United Kingdom Different Approaches to What Constitutes Research Integrity, and How Different National Systems Address These
Emilio Bossi Swiss Academies of Arts and Sciences Switzerland Challenges Encountered by the Swiss Academies of Arts and Sciences When Introducing Concepts for Promoting Scientific Integrity, and Attempts of Responses to these Challenges
Ronald Heslegrave Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network and Council of Canadian Academies Canada Research Integrity in the Canadian Context
Hung-Duen Yang National Sun Yat-Sen University Chinese Taipei Research Integrity in Taiwan
Tohru Masui National Institute of Biomedical Innovation Japan Researcher’s Integrity: Acquiring Reactivity and Losing Responsibility

Track 2: Codes of Conduct
Some governments, organizations, and research institutions have developed codes of conduct to help researchers understand their responsibilities. These codes and other similar documents, such as best practices and guidelines, differ significantly in purpose, content and authority. The sessions in this Track will provide participants with an opportunity to learn more about codes of conduct, their usefulness and their limitations.
Track 2a: The Organization and Purpose of Codes of Conduct 22 July, 14:00 - 16:00
Pacific 2
Chair: Makoto Asashima (Tokyo University)  
Throughout the world, research is both regulated and self-regulating. Codes of conduct and other similar documents, such as best practices and guidelines, are usually intended to aid self-regulation, although they can also sometime be part of regulations. This session will explore the different types of codes of conduct, their purpose, and the way they are used.
Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Melissa Anderson University of Minnesota United States A Framework for Examining Codes of Conduct on Research Integrity
Peter Mahaffy The International Council of Science Canada A Code of Conduct for Chemists
Matthias Kaiser National Committee for Research Ethics in Science and Technology Norway Dilemmas for Ethical Guidelines of Science
Carthage Smith International Council of Science France Freedom and Responsibility in the Conduct of Science -- Principles and Practices
Lida Anestidou National Academy of Science United States Codes or Guidelines? A Working Model of Integrity and Compliance in Laboratory Animal Research
John Sulston Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute United Kingdom Levels of Responsibility in the Conduct of Science
Track 2b: A Look at Current Codes 23 July, 14:00 - 16:00
Pacific 2
Chair: Jan Taplick (European Molecular Biology Organization)  
One way to learn what works and does not work is to study examples. The presentations in this session will briefly summarize one or more codes of conduct and the experience implementing them.
Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Pieter J.D. Drenth All European Academies Netherlands A European Code of Conduct for Research Integrity
Timothy Dyke National Health & Medical Research Council Australia The Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research and Related Standards
Ping Sun ORI, Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) China How Many Codes of Conduct Do We Need? Perspectives from China
Frank Wells European Forum for Good Clinical Practice United Kingdom A Way Forward? A report from the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice
Ashima Anand Delhi University India Society for Scientific Values- A movement to promote Ethics in the conduct of Science
John O'Neill Massey University New Zealand The Past, Present and Future of One University's Code of Research Ethics

Track 3: Training for Responsible Research
Over the last twenty years, interest in responsible conduct of research (RCR) training has grown throughout the world. However, the quality of this training varies considerably and is it still not widely available in most countries. The sessions in this Track will explore challenges faced in developing RCR education, with particular attention to goals, approaches to training, essential topics, outcomes, and assessment. Speakers from four global regions will discuss current developments and future plans in their areas.
Track 3a: United States and Asia 22 July, 14:00 - 16:00
Ocean 1&2
Chairs: Mary Ritter (Imperial College / EUA)
Ames Dhai (South Africa)
 
Speakers will discuss different aspects of the development of RCR training in the United States and Asia.
Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Session 1: Developments in the US
Michael Kalichman University of California, San Diego, CA United States Why, What, and How We Should Be Teaching About Research Integrity
Jean Feldman US National Science Foundation United States NSF Implementation of Required RCR Training: Background, Strategy and Status
Daniel Denecke Council of Graduate Schools United States An Institutional Approach to Embedding Research Integrity and the Responsible Conduct of Research in Graduate Education: The US Project for Scholarly Integrity
Philip J. Langlais Old Dominion University United States Challenges and Solutions to Establishing An Institutional Culture of Research Integrity
Daniel Vasgird West Virginia University United States Online RCR Training and the Use of Case Study Videos
       
Session 2: Developments in Asia
Wei Yang Zhejiang University China Fighting Research Misconduct by Integrated Tactics: Case Studies from China
Sang Wook Yi Hanyang University Korea Nurturing Good Research Practice Through Web-based Activities Korean Experience
Bruce McKellar University of Melbourne Australia Use of Case Studies in Training Students and Practitioners in Responsible Research Practice
Tetsuji Iseda Kyoto Universityy Japan How to Teach Research Integrity Without Using the Notion: Attempts in Japan
Tomoaki Tsuchida Waseda University Japan Research Ethics across Disciplines: An Educational Program at a Large-scale Research University
Track 3b: Europe, Africa, Latin America, and Global Programmes 23 July, 14:00 - 16:00
Ocean 1&2
Chair: David Engelke (United States)  
Speakers will discuss different aspects of the development of RCR training in the Europe, other countries, and global programmes
Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Session 1: Developments in Europe
Nils Axelsen Statens Serum Institut Denmark Statens Serum Institut's Course on Good Research Practice
Gerlinde Sponholz Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Germany A Curriculum for RCR-Training in Germany
David Babington-Smith Epigeum United Kingdom Delivering Online Ethics Training in the UK and Ireland Using Enhanced Multi-media (Video, Simulations) Online Training
Ragnvald Kalleberg University of Oslo Norway The Norwegian Model for Promoting RCT in Graduate Studies
Maria Leptin European Molecular Biology Organization Europe Time to Act on a Pan-European Policy on Research Integrity Training: How Can EMBO Contribute?
       
Session 2: Global developments
Sonia Maria Ramos Vasconcelos Federal University of Rio de Janeiro Brazil Developing Policies for RCR Training in Brazilian Graduate Programs: Current Challenges
Anthony Mullings University of the West Indies Jamaica Advancing Research Ethics Training in the Caribbean - Challenges and Success
Ames Dhai Biko Centre for Bioethics South Africa Preventing Research Misconduct : Some Programs in Africa
Paul Braunschweiger University of Miami & CITI Program United States The CITI Program: A Web-based Research Ethics Education Paradigm for the International Research Community
Iekuni Ichikawa Vanderbilt University & Tokai University of Medicine Japan Creating CITI Japan Program for Web-Based Training, Where Ethicis, Law and Science Experts Meet

Track 4: Research Integrity Issues for Authors and Editors
The sessions in this track will discuss research integrity issues relating to authorsip and editing with the goal of developing global guidance for both areas of research. Draft guidelines for authors and editors will be prepared and circulated in advance of the Conference and form the basis of the concurrent sessions and post-conference workshop.
Track 4a: International Standards/Best Practices for Authors 22 July, 14:00 - 16:00
Ocean 4&5
Chairs: Sabine Kleinert (Committee on Publication Ethics)
Linda Miller (Nature)
 
Publication is the final stage of research, so the role of researcher as author is an important one. Research integrity should cover the entire process from planning to publication. Individual journals, and groups of editors working in particular fields, have issued guidance for authors, but there are no universal standards. This session will explore good practice for authors, how guidance may prevent various types of misconduct, and set the stage for developing global policies during the post-Conference workshop.
Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Ana Marusic Council of Science Editors Croatia Report on Findings on Authorship Review
David Moher Ottawa Hospital Research Institute / EQUATOR Canada The EQUATOR Network: A Global Initiative to Improve the Quality of Reporting Research
Vasiliy Vlassov Moscow Medical Academy Russia Plagiarism in Russia and East Europe
Track 4b: International Standards/Best Practices for Editors 23 July, 14:00 - 16:00
Ocean 4&5
Chairs: Elizabeth Wager (Committee on Publication Ethics)
Diane Sullenberger (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences)
 
Editors are the gatekeepers for research publications. As such, they play an important role in preserving and promoting research integrity. And they bear some responsibility for publications and publication pratices that undermine the integrity of the research literature. This session will explore problems that arise in the publication process , discuss steps that have been taken to address these problems, and set the stage for developing more global guidelines for editors during the post-Conference workshop.
Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Douglas N. Arnold University of Minnesota / Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics News United States Challenges to Research Integrity and the Response of the Mathematics Research Community
Ben Martin University of Sussex United Kingdom [How Editors and Universities Can Work Together]
Bernd Pulverer European Molecular Biology Organization Germany How Biological Science Journals Can Contribute to Research Integrity
Hongwei Zhang China National Knowledge Infrastructure China CNKI's Exploration and Practice in Improving Digital Publishing and Resisting Academic Misconduct
Note: Titles in "[]" are tentative and may be changed.


Concurrent Sessions 2 (Research Integrity in the News)
23 July, 11:00 - 12:30

Special Concurrent 1: Integrity in the Climate-Change Debate 23 July, 11:00 - 12:30
Pacific 1
Chair: Tony Mayer (Nanyang Technological University and European Science Foundation)  

Emails written by climate-change researchers, released into the public domain by hackers, have provoked intense scrutiny in the United Kingdom of the integrity of this crucial field of research. That the researchers were indiscrete in what they wrote is clear but numerous enquiries have cleared them of any suggestion that they distorted or misrepresented data. The IPCC itself is also under scrutiny having failed to follow its stated processes . Climate research is based on global research programmes and on the basis of trust between many researchers worldwide. How can one provide 'integrity quality control' in such global programmes? What standards should apply when researchers become public advocates and involved in public debates. This session will explore this aspect of research integrity in an area which is both topical and of major political relevance.

Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Ann Henderson-Sellers Macquarie University Australia Research Integrity's Burning Fuse: Climate Truth Before Change Explodes
Fred Pearce Guardian Newspaper United Kingdom Truth, Lies and the Climategate E-Mails
Carlos Nobre Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Brazil Lessons of the 'Amazongate' to the IPCC Process
Mark Frankel American Association for the Advancement of Science United States Turning Up the Heat on Research Integrity: Lessons from 'Climategate'

Special Concurrent 2: Integrity in the Digital Age 23 July, 11:00 - 12:30
Pacific 2
Chairs: Deborah Runkle (American Association for the Advancement of Science)
Peter Brooks (King Abdullah University of Science & Technology )
 
The migration of record keeping and publication from print to digital technology has raised new problems for research integrity. Digital technology can also be used detect misbehavior and foster integrity in research. This session will explore the use of digital technology for detecting plagiarism, duplicate publication, and improper photo manipulation.
Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Harold R. 'Skip' Garner Virginia Tech United States The Characteristics of Highly Similar Scientific Publications
Xiongyong Sun China National Knowledge Infrastructure China CNKI AMLC System's Advances in Development and Application and the Plan for International Cooperation
John Dahlberg Office of Research Integrity United States ORI's Forensic Approach in Reviewing Questioned Data and Images
John Barrie iParadigms United States Vetting Scholarly Work for Originality

Special Concurrent 3: Integrity Issues in Dual-Use Research 23 July, 11:00 - 12:30
Ocean 1&2
Chairs: Lida Anestidou (National Academies of Science)
Paula Strickland (National Institutes of Health)
 
This session will explore questions about responsibility and integrity that arise in research that has both useful and harmful applications. Do researchers have special responsibilities when they work in these fields? If so, what should these responsibilities be?
Speaker Name Organization Country Title
Lida Anestidou National Academies of Science United States Integrity in science with dual-use potential
Gerald Epstein American Association for the Advancement of Science United States Governance Options for Dual-Use Research
David Franz US Office of the Secretary of Defense United States The Role of Leadership and Culture within the Laboratory
Daniel Davis National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity United States Codes of Conduct as Tools for Fostering Responsibility in Dual Use Research: The Work of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity, USA
Robert Mathews University of Melbourne Australia The Role of Awareness-Raising, Education and Codes of Conduct in the Dual-Use Research Environment
Elizabeth Heitman Vanderbilt University United States Research with Dual-Use Potential in RCR Education: Is There a Role for Codes?


IV. Post-Conference Workshops and Training Sessions
24 July, 9:00 - 17:00

Workshop 1. Planning and training for Misconduct Investigations Ocean 1
As countries increase their emphasis on research, the need to conduct responsible investigations of reported problems is likely to grow. Drawing on the experience of countries with experience conducting investigation, this workshop will provide a short course for administrators and researchers who want to learn the basics of conducting a responsible investigation. During the closing sessions, participants will develop conclusions and recommendations for promoting greater cooperation in the development of national research integrity structures and mechanisms facilitating research misconduct investigations in international collaborations.
Introduction and Welcome 9:00-9:10
Chair: Dirk de Hen ENRIO & LOWI (National Board of Research Integrity) Netherlands
 
Session 1 Institutional Structures for Ensuring Integrity 9:10-10:00

Panel members will discuss institutional, national and international mechanisms for ensuring integrity and responsible conduct. Further discussion will focus on the need for agreements between partners at all levels to common principles to ensure such conduct within a research project. Discussion will focus way to ensure cooperation and fairness at all levels.

Outcome: Framework for the essential elements of national research integrity structures

Christine C. Boesz Advisor, U.S Government Accountability Expert United States
Ren Yi University of Southern Queensland Australia
Jose Antonio Cuellar Puente Mexican College of Physicians / National Institutes of Health Mexico
 
Session 2 The Role of the Research Integrity Officer (RIO) 10:05-11:00

Panel members will discuss the role of the official responsible for managing responsible conduct of research training programs and research misconduct investigations to balance the demands of local, national and international concerns. Focus will be placed on the aspects of such programs that will ensure comprehensive training for researchers who are working together on a project but who were trained in different national systems. Mechanisms will be explored by which the RIO can ensure the fair treatment of individuals who hail from different countries but are joint subjects of an investigation and can convey the confidential results of these investigations to relevant institutions.

Outcome: Recommendations for functions and duties of research integrity officers

David Wright Michigan State University / ORI United States
Eero Vuorio University of Turku Finland
Sylvia Rumball Massey University, New Zealand New Zealand
 
Break 11:00-11:20
 
Session 3 Conducting Investigations into allegations of research misconduct in international collaborative research Projects 11:00-11:20
Speakers will discuss the basic principles of research misconduct investigations and then use specific examples to facilitate the discussion of the key components to thorough, fair and complete investigations.
Peggy Fischer National Science Foundation, Inspector General Office United States
John Dahlberg Office of Research Integrity United States
David Wright Michigan State University/ORI United States
 
Lunch Working Lunch Break ~ Case studies 12:30-1:30
 
(Session 3, continued) 1:30-3:00
 
Break 3:00-3:30
 
Session 4 Developing a framework for addressing Research Misconduct in International Collaborations 3:30-5:00

Panel members will describe and discuss the unique aspects of international collaborations that make them vulnerable to misunderstandings and allegations of research misconduct with the goal of suggesting ways countries can collaborate in their response.

Outcome: Final conclusions and recommendations for promoting greater cooperation in the development of national research integrity structures and mechanisms for facilitating research misconduct investigations in international collaborations.

Christine C. Boesz Advisor, U.S Government Accountability Expert United States
David Wright Michigan State University United States
Dirk de Hen ENRIO & LOWI (National Board of Research Integrity) Netherlands
Eero Vuorio University of Turku Finland
John Dahlberg Office of Research Integrity United States
Jose Antonio Cuellar Puente Mexican College of Physicians / National Institutes of Health Mexico
Peggy Fischer National Science Foundation, Inspector General Office United States
Ren Yi University of Southern Queensland Australia
Sylvia Rumball Massey University, New Zealand New Zealand

Workshop 2. Codes of Conduct Ocean 2
Codes of conduct and other types of guidance documents play an important role in defining expectations for responsible professional behavior in research. There are many codes of conduct to which researchers can turn for advice but these codes unfortunately vary considerably in content, useability, and availability. This is particularly true for researchers whose work is interdisciplinary and/or international. The goal of this workshop is to discuss and suggest ways to bring more uniformity to research codes of conduct and to strengthen their role in promoting integrity in research.
 
Introduction and Welcome 9:00-9:10
Chair: Tony Mayer Nanyang Technological University/ European Science Foundation UK-Singapore
 
Session 1: Institutional and Professional Codes 9:10-10:30

With a few examples as models, the goal of this session is to discuss the goals, content, and use of codes of conduct developed by research institutions and professional or academic societies. Questions to address include:

1. What is the purpose of a research code of conduct at the level of research institutions and professional or academic societies?
2. What topics or areas should these codes cover?
3. Should these codes play a regulatory role, such as setting standards for judging behavior?
4. What are the problems that arise when adopting institutional codes?
Ragnvald Kalleberg University of Oslo Norway
Frank Wells European Forum for Good Clinical Practice United Kingdom
Peter Mahaffy The International Council of Science Canada
 
Break 10:30-11:00
Session 2: National Codes 11:00-12:30

With a few examples as models, the goal of this session is to discuss the goals, content, and use of national codes of conduct. Questions to address include:

1. What is the purpose of a research code of conduct at the national level?
2. What topics or areas should these codes cover?
3. Should these codes play a regulatory role, such as setting standards for judging behavior?
4. What are the problems that arise when adopting national codes?
Matthias Kaiser National Committee for Research Ethics in Science and Technology Norway
Timothy Dyke National Health & Medical Research Council Australia
Sergio Litewka PABI, University of Miami & CITI Program United States
 
Lunch 12:30-1:30
 
Session 3: Regional and International Codes 13:30-15:00

With a few examples as models, the goal of this session is to discuss the goals, content, and use of the few regional or international codes of conduct that exist. Questions to address include:

1. What is the purpose of a research code of conduct at the regional level?
2. What topics or areas should these codes cover?
3. Should these codes play a regulatory role, such as setting standards for judging behavior?
4. What are the problems that arise when adopting regional codes?
Pieter Drenth ESF Code ESF / Europe
Yali Cong Peking University Health Science Center China
Lida Anestidou National Academies of Science United States
 
Break 15:00-15:30
Session 4: Universal Codes, The Singapore Statement 15:30-16:30
Suggestions have been made for a universal code of conduct for research but none has ever been widely adopted. Some suggest that this is due to the very diverse nature of research. Nonetheless, researchers seem to believe in fundamental values and to understand when they have been violated. This session will explore the potential role of the Singapore Statement, which may or may not be affirmed during the Conference, in promoting integrity in research.
Melissa Anderson University of Minnesota United States
Emilio Bossi Swiss Academies of Arts and Sciences Switzerland
Carthage Smith International Council of Science International
 
Wrap up: Conclusions and Recommendations 16:30-17:00
 

Workshop 3. International Responsible Conduct of Research Education Workshop Ocean 3
The primary purpose of the workshop will be to draft consensus statements and/or specific plans for next steps with respect to goals, content, approaches, best practices and strategies for the development of responsible conduct of research (RCR) training programs. A secondary goal will be to increase awareness and interest in some of the approaches for promoting RCR education. It is hoped that this workshop will at the very least provide a roadmap for producing consensus statements, suggested practices, or international collaborations. Outcomes could include tools for teaching RCR, recommendations for approaches, a "how to" handbook to get programs started, or the establishment of an international network of RCR experts.
 
Introduction and Welcome 9:00-9:10
Chair: Nicholas Steneck United States
 
Panel 1: Goals & Audience 9:10-10:30

If our long-term goal is to produce effective programs for RCR education, then we need to first be clear on our goals so that we can assess program effectiveness. This session will address questions such as:

1. What are the goals and rationales for RCR education?
2. Who is the audience for RCR education programs?
3. To what extent is there international agreement about goals and audience??
4. On what key issues, if any, do we not find consensus?
Michael Kalichman University of California, San Diego, CA United States
Nils Axelsen Statens Serum Institut Denmark
Sonia Ramos Maria Vasconcelos Federal University of Rio de Janeiro Brazil
Anthony Mullings University of the West Indies Jamaica
 
Break 10:30-11:00
Panel 2: Content 11:00-12:30

In addition to knowing how (settings, tools) RCR education should be provided, it is necessary to know what topics should be covered. This session will address questions such as:

1. What topics should be considered part of RCR education?
2. What topics, if any, are necessary for everyone?
3. To what extent is there international agreement about the topics to be covered?
4. For which topics, if any, do we not find consensus?
Philip Langlais Old Dominion University United States
Gerlinde Sponholz Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Germany
Sang Wook Yi Hanyang University Korea
Mary Ritter Imperial College United Kingdom
 
Lunch 12:30-1:30
 
Panel 3: Tools and resources 13:30-14:45

Based on the goals and audience for RCR education, the best approaches may vary. It is important to note that while classroom meetings structured around discussion of case studies often come to mind first, these are not the only approaches, nor are they necessarily the best approaches, to address the intended goals and audiences. This session will address questions such as:

1. What are the options for educational settings to teach about RCR?
2. What kinds of tools are available to encourage RCR discussion and learning?
3. What is the evidence for the effectiveness of these approaches?
4. To what extent is there international agreement about the best choices for settings and tools?
5. On what best practices for settings and tools, if any, do we not find consensus?
Paul Braunschweiger University of Miami & CITI Program United States
David Babington-Smith Epigeum United Kingdom
Bruce McKellar International Council of Science Australia
Jean Feldman US National Science Foundation United States
 
Break 14:45-15:15
Panel 4: Programme development 15:15-16:30

Sustainable RCR training requires planning and support to create practical, effective programmes. RCR programs exist in many forms and at different levels, from the strategies developed by a single department to institutional initiatives and government-driven national efforts. It is unlikely that one plan or one programme will work in every country but some mechanisms may be useful to assure comparability across countries. This session will address questions such as:

1. Should there be minimum international standards or a fundamental basic curriculum for RCR training?
2. Could international standards for RCR training be assessed and if so, how?
Elizabeth Heitman Vanderbilt University United States
Jan Taplick European Molecular Biology Organization Europe
Ames Dhai Biko Centre for Bioethics South Africa
Tomoaki Tsuchida Waseda University Japan
 
Next Steps 16:30-17:00
 

Workshop 4. Workshop for Authors and Editors Ocean 4
The Workshop for Authors and Editors is organized around two guidance documents developed by the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). During the morning sessions, participants willdiscuss these documents and make recommendations for their adoption on a broad global basis. The afternoon session will provide an opportunity to present and discuss cases, with the goal of helping editors and authors understand best practices and practical ways for assuring high standards for integrity in research publication.
 
Introduction and Welcome 9:00-9:10
Chairs: Sabine Kleinert (COPE) and Elizabeth Wager (COPE) United States /United Kingdom
 
Session 1: Defining goals and content 9:10-9:45
During this session, the presenters will summarize the ideas and recommendations presented during the Conference, focusing on areas of agreement and disagreement, leading to a list is issues that remain to be resolved. The purpose of this session is todevelop an agenda for the two breakout groups that follow.
Sabine Kleinert Committee on Publication Ethics United Kingdom
Elizabeth Wager Committee on Publication Ethics United Kingdom
Diane Sullenberger Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences United States
 
Session 2: Breakout discussion 9:45-11:30
During this session, participants will divide into two working groups (one focused on guidance for authors the other on guidance for editors) to discuss the outstanding issues identified in the opening session and to develop recommendations to address these issues.
Discussion Leaders Organization Country
Editors:
  Sabine Kleinert
  Douglas Arnold
Committee on Publication Ethics
University of Minnesota / Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics News
United Kingdom
United States
Ping Sun ORI, Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) China
Authors:
  Elizabeth Wager
  Ana Marusic
Committee on Publication Ethics
Council of Science Editors
United Kingdom
Croatia
 
Break 20 min. during session
 
Session 3: Reports from the breakout groups, discussion 11:30-12:30
During this session, rappeuteurs from the two working groups will summarize their conclusions and recommendations, with the goal of reaching agreement on the language in the two guidance documents.
 
Lunch 12:30-13:30
 
Session 4: Case studies 13:30-16:00
During this session, COPE and other participants will present case studies involving authorship and editing issues but discussion. The session will begin with a brief desciption of the process COPE uses to review and provide advice on cases. The goal of the session is to provide practical guidance on how to deal with difficult integrity issues in publication.
 
Break 20 min.during session
 
Session 5: Wrap up, Steps to promote global best practices for authors and editors 16:00-17:00
Discussion of next steps toward the adoption of global guidance for authors and editors
 

 

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